Upcoming seminar: On competition of species with different diffusion strategies  

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Speaker: Dr. Elena Braverman, University of Calgary
Location: Mathematical Sciences 431
Date: Thursday, March 30, 2017
Time: 14:00-15:00

Title: On competition of species with different diffusion strategies

Abstract: Evolutionary survival and extinction of species are strongly influenced by their intrinsic properties (such as the growth rate and the carrying capacity) and a smart choice of a dispersal strategy. We study the interaction between two species choosing different types of movement in a heterogeneous environment, where in addition intrinsic growth rates and carrying capacities can be different. We also consider the case when the choice of dispersal strategies guarantees coexistence, and compare different diffusion strategies. Generally, higher diffusion coefficients are detrimental while higher growth rates, as well as lower resources sharing, are beneficial for population survival.

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Seminar: A Gentle Introduction to (Hyper-)Elliptic Curves and their Use in Cryptography

Dr. Renate Scheidler, who is a faculty member at the Department of Mathematics and Statistics of the University of Calgary, presented last Thursday, March 16, 2017, at 2:00 pm. The seminar was appreciated by many graduate/undergraduate students and a number of faculty members and post-doctoral researchers.

Dr. Scheidler’s presentation was mainly related Elliptic Curves and their applications in Cryptography. The talk provided an introduction to arithmetic on elliptic and hyperelliptic curves as well as their context in cryptography.

Upcoming seminar: A Gentle Introduction to (Hyper-)Elliptic Curves and their Use in Cryptography 

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Speaker: Dr. Renate Scheidler, University of Calgary
Location: Mathematical Sciences 431
Date: Thursday, March 16, 2017
Time: 14:00-15:00

Title: A Gentle Introduction to (Hyper-)Elliptic Curves and their Use in Cryptography

Abstract: Elliptic and low genus hyperelliptic curves represent a highly suitable setting for cryptography, due to their small space requirements, efficient arithmetic, and excellent security properties. Elliptic curve cryptography, for example, currently provides information protection in the Blackberry smartphone, Blu-ray technology, and other real world applications. Unfortunately, curve cryptosystems fall victim to quantum attacks, as does the widely used RSA scheme. Nevertheless, our devices are safe until researchers actually manage to build a large-scale quantum computer. Moreover, elliptic and genus two hyperelliptic curves have become the subject of intense research into quantum resistant cryptography.

This talk will provide a gentle introduction to arithmetic on elliptic and hyperelliptic curves as well as their context in cryptography. It is targeted at an audience with no or minimal exposure to cryptography and no prior knowledge of algebraic curves or number theory.

Seminar: Reliability-constrained hydropower valuation

Dr. Antony Ware, the Graduate Director of Department of Mathematics and Statistics of the University of Calgary, presented last Thursday, March 02, 2017. He presented an industrial project about hydropower valuation that he had worked before.

Basically, the presentation was regarding maximizing the long-term value of hydropower generation subject to variable constraints on outflows and exposure to possibly wildly varying power prices. He used a stochastic dynamic programming approach to the quantification of reservoir reliability, for instance, measures of the risk of over-topping the reservoir or failing to satisfy downstream flow requirements, and a related approach to determining the reservoir flow strategy that maximizes expected revenue, subject to defined target reliability levels.

Upcoming seminar: Reliability-constrained hydropower valuation

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Speaker: Dr. Antony Ware, University of Calgary
Location: Mathematical Sciences 431
Date: Thursday, March 02, 2017
Time: 15:00-16:00

Title: Reliability-constrained hydropower valuation

Abstract: Maximizing the long-term value of hydropower generation requires management of uncertain reservoir inflows, potentially variable constraints on outflows, and exposure to possibly wildly varying power prices. In this talk we present a stochastic dynamic programming approach to the quantification of reservoir reliability (for example, measures of the risk of over-topping the reservoir or failing to satisfy downstream flow requirements) and a related approach to determining the reservoir flow strategy that maximizes expected revenue, subject to defined target reliability levels.

Seminar: grid algebra and finite difference methods

Speaker: Dr. Michael P. Lamoureux, University of Calgary Location: Mathematical Sciences 431 Date: Thursday, February 16, 2017 Time: 15:00-16:00 Title: Grid algebra and finite difference methods Abstract: We are all familiar with linear algebra and methods for representing linear operators as an n by n matrix. Today, we will discuss representing operators on a 2D […]

Last Thursday, February 16, 2017, Dr. Michael P. Lamoureux who is a faculty member at the Department of Mathematics and Statistics of the University of Calgary gave a presentation entitled Grid Algebra and Finite Difference Methods.
Dr. Lameroux talked about two-dimensional and three-dimensional finite difference method for the wave equation with constant velocity. In particular, how to develop a numerical algorithm for the wave equation. Some numerical simulations were also presented.

The audiences were from different backgrounds including undergraduates, graduates and postdocs and faculty members. Here are some pictures of this event.

Upcoming seminar: grid algebra and finite difference methods

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Speaker: Dr. Michael P. Lamoureux, University of Calgary
Location: Mathematical Sciences 431
Date: Thursday, February 16, 2017
Time: 15:00-16:00

Title: Grid algebra and finite difference methods

Abstract: We are all familiar with linear algebra and methods for representing linear operators as an n by n matrix. Today, we will discuss representing operators on a 2D or 3D grid, or more generally on a directed graph. We develop linear algebraic methods to simplify or factor the operator into a form that is easy to solve using back-substitution. Such techniques are useful in numerical solutions of partial differential equations. We apply the technique to implement an implicit solver for a finite difference algorithm applied to the wave equation in two dimensions.